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Summer 2017 Newsletter

  • » July, 2017

    July

    All participating counties will receive individualized results.

     

    Steve Presley, a professor in The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH) at Texas Tech University and director of the Biological Threat Research Lab, says there will almost certainly be an outbreak of Zika virus this year.

    Full Story

     

  • » June, 2017

    June 6, 2017

    June 7, 2017

    June 8, 2017

    June 15, 2017

    June 20, 2017

    June 28, 2017

    TIEHH Researcher Studying Zika-Transmitting Mosquitoes’

    Resistance to Commonly Used Insecticides

     

     

    Steve Presley, a professor in The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH) at Texas Tech University and director of the Biological Threat Research Lab, says there will almost certainly be an outbreak of Zika virus this year.

     

    “I don’t know if it will be in Texas; there probably will be isolated areas where there are outbreaks,” he said. “I wouldn’t even hazard to try to predict how many we’ll see or how bad it’ll be. The potential is there, though. We know that.”

     

    With that in mind, Presley is preparing to launch an important statewide research project funded by a $200,000 public health grant from the Texas Department of State Health Services. The goal is to study the effectiveness of insecticides used throughout the state against the two mosquito species that transmit Zika virus and other diseases.

    Full Story

     

    Posted on 6 June 2017 by Maciej Heyman

    AGRICULTURE COMMUNITY RALLIES IN SUPPORT OF COTTON

    RESEARCHERS FIND NEW USES

    Texans commonly use the phrase "cotton is king:' and Lubbockites understand why as the top 11 cotton-pro­ducing  counties in the nation were within 80 miles of the city as of 2015. So, with the recent title 1 safety net program being shot down with the omnibus appro­priations bill passing the U.S. House and U.S. Senate, with no aid for cotton, it is an important time for Lubbockites to rally to support the cotton industry to maintain king cotton and its irreplaceable value to the area's econ­omy and way of life.

     

    Full Story

    TTU researchers beginning Zika study that could help the entire state

    Published: Thursday, June 8th 2017, 6:33 pm CDT

    By Presley Fowler, Reporter

    LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) -

     

    Summer means more time spent outdoors, and inevitably, mosquito season.

     

    And research in the fight against Zika virus is ongoing.

     

    In fact, some major research that will help the entire state is happening right here in Lubbock.

     

    Dr. Steve Presley, Director of Texas Tech's Biological Threat Research Lab is heading up this major research project funded by the Texas Department of State Health Services.

    Full Story

     

    As Texas Tech University approached its 75th year, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH) was established as a collaborative effort addressing environmental and human health impacts of pollutants.  Immediately since it’s founding in 1997, the institute enjoyed broad support from the university and community, serving as one of the anchor tenants for a newly established research park. On 9 May, TIEHH celebrated 20 years of environmental research and impact at Texas Tech.

     

    Sustaining Affiliate Member Spotlight: The Institute of

    Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH)

    Todd Anderson, Texas Tech University

     

    Full Story

    Texas Tech researcher receives grant to test mosquito pesticides in Texas counties

    Posted June 19, 2017 05:30 pm

    By ELLYSA HARRIS

    A-J Media

     

    When city of Lubbock Vector Control crew goes out to spray for mosquitoes, Steven Presley said it’s questionable how strongly the pesticide affects two species of mosquitoes known as potential carriers of Zika virus.

     

    “You’re getting pesticide out in the air,” said Presley, director of the Biological Threat Research Laboratory of The Institute of Environmental and Human Health of Texas Tech University, but both species - Aedes Albopictus and the Aedes Aegypti - tend to live immediately around the house.

    Full Story

     

     

    TTU expert addresses concerns about prairie dogs and the plague

    Wednesday, June 28th 2017, 7:28 pm CDT

     

    LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) -

     

    The New Mexico Department of Health says three cases of the plague have been confirmed this month in Santa Fe County.

     

    The plague can be transmitted to humans through the bites of infected fleas, rodents, or even pets. But should we be alarmed here on the South Plains?

     

    "Plague does occur in this area, it's just that human cases don't typically occur," said Dr. Steven Presley, with the Texas Tech Department of Environmental Toxicology.

     

    The plague is a zoonotic disease that is cycled in and around animals.

     

    One rodent we see all across Lubbock can carry the plague. Dr. Presley says black-tailed prairie dogs are the primary reservoir for the plague in this region.

     

    Full Story

  • » February, 2017

    Collaborative Research Shows Finer Raw Cotton Best for Oil Spill Remediation

    February 27, 2017

     

    By: Glenys Young

    Two Lubbock high school seniors were involved in conducting the experiments.

     

    Cotton, a longtime staple crop on the South Plains and major part of the region’s economy, is growing into a new sector: environmental cleanup following oil spills.

     

    The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH) at Texas Tech University has found that finer raw cotton in loose form performs best for absorbing oil, according to a study in the March/April 2017 issue of the AATCC Journal of Research published by the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC).

     

    Full Story

     

  • » September, 2016

    September 6 , 2016

    Innovation on Campus

    By: John Davis

    Texas Tech University faculty are creating technologies that could change the face of their respective fields. Here are three examples of Texas Tech ingenuity and how they work.

    Eco-Friendly Decontamination

     

    ramkumar with samples and posters of fibertectFor more than a decade, scientists at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health have been reinventing and repurposing a nonwoven decontamination product called FiberTect®.

     

    The latest version of FiberTect® developed in 2013 has proven itself more viable at cleaning up a nerve chemical surrogate than the decontamination substance currently used by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), which is currently being phased out.

     

    Full Story

  • » August, 2016

    Aug. 1, 2016

    Aug. 17, 2016

    Aug. 18, 2017

    Texas Tech: Only LRN in world at an academic institution working against Zika

     

    By Taylor Lee, Weekend Anchor

    LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) -

     

    Texas Tech is playing an active role in the research of Zika. The university has a special lab that is capable of screening samples for Zika. The lab is called a Laboratory Response Network.

     

    "We're a designated public health laboratory to screen human samples," said Dr. Steve Presley, Director of Biological Threat Research Laboratory.

     

    The city and the state have developed a mutual relationship over the years.

    "My lab is part of the public health emergency preparedness program. if there's a major issue we work with whoever the authority is," said Dr. Presley.Full Story

     

     

    Protecting Against Zika: TTU Researchers Lead New Mosquito Testing Across the Panhandle

    By Alyssa Goard | agoard@kamc.tv

    Published 08/17 2016 08:26PM

     

    Lubbock, TX

     

    Concerns about Zika virus are pushing the Texas to learn more about which areas of the Lone Star State are more at risk if the virus were to spread.

     

    The Texas Department of State Health Services has been working with mosquito experts from around the state. On the panhandle this week, that partnership with mosquito experts is leading to more information than ever before about what risk communities in the area might face when it comes to Zika.  Tuesday and Wednesday, mosquito egg traps or "ovitraps" were sent from Texas Tech's mosquito researchers to Texas A&M Agrilife Extension agents to leave in 32 counties around the Panhandle-- reaching as far as the Amarillo and Midland areas.

    Full Story

     

    When the Dust Settles

    September 2016 By Eva Hershaw

     

    After Texas Tech researchers discovered that windstorms may be spreading antibiotic-resistant bacteria from local feedlots, public health experts stood up and took notice. So did the Texas Cattle Feeders Association.

    Full Story

     

     

  • » May, 2016

    May 24

    May 25

    May 25

    Researcher Wins Technical Achievement Award from Industry-Leading Professional Group

    March 24, 2016

     

    A Texas Tech mosquito expert will be testifying before Congress about the Zika virus this week. Dr. Steven M. Presley, Ph. D. is a professor at Texas Tech and the director of TTU's Biological Threat Research Laboratory, he has been researching mosquitoes and the diseases they carry for three decades. On Tuesday he will embark for Washington, D.C. and on Wednesday at 9:15 a.m. Eastern he will present with three other experts before the United States House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology about the Zika virus which has caused major public concern in the past year.

    Full Story

    Texas Tech professor participates in congressional panel discussion about Zika virus

    Posted: May 25, 2016 - 8:16pm

    Watch the Congressional Panel Discussion

    Members of the Congressional Committee on Science, Space & Technology hosted a presentation about the Zika virus Wednesday in Washington, D.C.

     

    The event featured a scientific panel discussion with four members, including Dr. Steve Presley of Lubbock.

     

    The panel discussion was streamed live online.

     

    Panelists discussed topics ranging from the history of Zika to what to expect moving forward.

     

    The panel included four scientists including Presley, professor in the department of environmental toxicology at Texas Tech; Dr. Kacey Ernst, associate professor in the department of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of Arizona; Dr. Daniel Neafsey, associate director at the Genomic Center for Infectious Disease at the Barod Institute of MIT and Harvard; and Hadyn Parry, chief executive officer of Oxitec: Innovative Insect Control.

     

  • » April, 2016

    April 21, 2016

    April 21, 2016

    April 25, 2016

    TTU researchers study dust in Lubbock air for pollutants

     

    A group of Texas Tech University Department of Environmental Toxicology researchers plan to dissect the dust in Lubbock’s air.

     

    Phil Smith, an associate professor of environmental toxicology, said researchers have collected dust samples from in and around the city limits.

     

        "When those big storms blow up and blow across the city,” Smith said, “we really want to know what's in those samples.”

     

    The samples will be analyzed for pollutants, and Smith said the results will be released in the next few months.     “Just to determine exactly what we're seeing,” he said. “It could be heavy metals, it could be pesticides…it could be a wide variety. It could be nothing.”

     

    This is a similar process Smith used in a recent study he conducted to find out the air quality around South Plains feedlots.

    Full Story

    Ramkumar Wins 2016 President’s Excellence in Commercialization Award

    April 21, 2016

     

    By: Glenys Young

    The award was presented at the Faculty Honors Convocation on Thursday.

    Texas Tech University professor Seshadri Ramkumar has been selected as the recipient of the 2016 President’s Excellence in Commercialization Award.

     

    Ramkumar, a professor of technical textiles and countermeasures to chemical threats in Texas Tech’s Department of Environmental Toxicology and The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), is being recognized for his revolutionary contributions to nonwoven materials.

     

    “I am humbled by this honor as it recognizes translational efforts,” Ramkumar said. “Texas Tech has to be applauded for creating many programs to support ‘mind to market research’ and help young students to be entrepreneurs. The next phase of research is all about technology transfer, and Texas Tech is rightfully investing in this effort by involving in programs such as 3 Day Startup, the National Science Foundation’s I-Corps, 1 Million Cups and more.” Full Story

    Research conducted by former ENTX graduate student Scott Weir and faculty on environmental stressors to the Dunes Sagebrush Lizard appeared on the cover of the May 2016 issue of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. Full Story

  • » March, 2016

    March 1, 2016

    March 7, 2016

    March 22, 2016

    March 24, 2016

    Suominen Adds to R&D Team

    Posted: March 1, 2016

    Four appointments are key actions in executing the company's strategy.

    Suominen Corporation continues to strengthen its product development function by appointing four new people, three of which have earned Ph.D. degrees, to Suominen’s global research & development team. The appointments are key actions in executing Suominen’s strategy, since adding capabilities to build a strong product company is one of the strategic focus areas.

    ......Muralidhar (Murali) Lalagiri, Ph.D., has been appointed product development manager effective February 1, 2016. Lalagiri has worked close to eight years on nonwovens and advanced materials. He has been working as a filtration product development engineer at Walker Engineering Enterprises since April 2014, after earning a Ph.D. in Environmental Toxicology, with specialization in nonwovens and advanced materials (Texas Tech University, TX, 2013). Lalagiri got his BS degree in Biotechnology from Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, India in 2007.

    Full Story

    Should we eliminate mosquitoes for good?

    Experts say the pests have their niche

    Posted: March 6, 2016 - 6:02pm  |  Updated: March 7, 2016 - 12:08am

    They’re small, quiet, and often go unnoticed until that little red bump shows up on your arm or leg and won’t stop itching. Merely an itch is the best case scenario, because viral diseases transmitted by mosquitoes can be downright deadly.

     

    There are more than 3,000 known species of mosquitoes. While only a few hundred of them are known to draw blood from humans to help develop their eggs, those mosquitoes are responsible for about 725,000 deaths per year, according to the Gates Foundation. Another 200 million cases a year leave people incapacitated for days at a time.

    Full Story

    Discover Texas Tech: The Institute of Environmental and Human Health

    March 22, 2016

    (VIDEO) This series offers a unique perspective into the university and all it has to offer.

    For two decades, Texas Tech University, in partnership with the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, has conducted highly critical research on contaminants in the environment, pollution effects, insect-borne diseases and other biological threats. This research is the basis of The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), one of the few places in the nation committed to environmental toxicology.

     

    Full Story

     

    Researcher Wins Technical Achievement Award from Industry-Leading Professional Group

    March 24, 2016

     

    Seshadri Ramkumar will receive his honor during the group’s conference in May.

     

    A Texas Tech University researcher has been chosen to receive a prestigious technical achievement award from TAPPI.

     

    Seshadri Ramkumar, a professor of technical textiles and countermeasures to chemical threats in Texas Tech’s Department of Environmental Toxicology and The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), will receive TAPPI’s NET (Nonwovens Engineers and Technologists) Division Technical Achievement Award and the Mark Hollingsworth Prize for technical advancement in the field. The TAPPI NET Division is the world’s leading professional group in the field of nonwoven technology, and the Technical Achievement Award is deemed the highest technical award for the field’s researchers.

    Full Story

  • » February, 2016

    February 2, 2016

    February 11, 2016

    February 17, 2016

    Texas Tech Mosquito Expert Breaks Down Risks of Zika Virus, Chances of Seeing it in Lubbock

    "It's a very scary virus"

    By Alyssa Goard | agoard@kamc.tv

    Published 02/02 2016 09:03PM

    Updated 02/02 2016 09:07PM

     

    Concerns are mounting internationally over the Zika virus, which spread recently through travelers and mosquitoes in Central America.

     

    "It's a scary virus, it ranks right up there with Dengue fever and Chikungunya virus," explained, Steve Presley, Ph.D., who runs Texas Tech's mosquito research program through the Institute of Environmental and Human Health.Full Story

     

     

    Play Video

    Devastation Continues for Families Near Poisonous Gas Leak

    "Like something out of a horror movie."

    By Wes Rapaport | wrapaport@kamc.tv

    Published 02/11 2016 09:43PM

    Nearly two months after an oil well blowout about 4 miles east of Seminole, some residents said the oil company has not addresses their concerns properly.

     

    Dozens of families were displaced when the well blew out on December 8, 2015. Gaines County emergency response teams were on scene for at least a week.

     

    Hydrogen sulfide, or H2S, was released in the blowout.  The potentially deadly gas made contact with many homes, forcing evacuations within a 2-mile radius.

     

    Full Story

    Released: 17-Feb-2016 11:05 AM EST

    Source Newsroom: Texas Tech University

    Newswise —

    Zika virus, primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, was first discovered in Uganda in 1947. For decades, it was known as a short-lived, relatively mild illness with no long-lasting effects. That all changed in September when Brazilian doctors noticed a 1,400 percent spike in congenital brain deformities in a part of Brazil that experienced a Zika outbreak months earlier.

     

    In early February, Dallas health officials reported a man infected a partner during sex. Brazilian scientists then announced they had found live strains of the virus in the urine and saliva of infected individuals. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put its emergency operations center on the highest level of activation to respond to an outbreak.

    Full Story

  • » January, 2016

    January 21, 2016

    January, 2016

    Goliath's grimy snow mountains not

    leaving Lubbock any time soon

    Posted: January 20, 2016 - 8:24pm | Updated: January 21, 2016 - 12:13am

     

    It’s been 25 days since the last snow from Winter Storm Goliath fell on the Hub City.

     

    But reminders of the near-record-breaking blizzard that dumped 11.2 inches of snow in two days after Christmas are still piled up in countless grimy black, brown — and sometimes yellow — heaping mountains in parking lots and along streets around the city...

    ...Just don’t get any ideas about testing it out on that snow ice cream recipe you didn’t try when the snow fell — unless you like the taste of what one Texas Tech expert called a combination of “gasoline, motor oil, dirt, tires, asphalt and poo.”

    Full Story

    TTU White-Tailed Deer Lab is featured on the Deer Breeders - Winter 2016 Edition - Magazine Cover

  • » December, 2015

    Kadal Chirpi, Chennai, India, December 1-15, 2015

  • » October, 2015

    October 6, 2015

    Duke and Texas Tech to Host 2016 Global Senior Scholars

    Dr. Weimin Gao

    The Society of Toxicology Education Committee is pleased to announce the selection of the Hosts for the 2016 Global Senior Scholar Exchange Program (GSSEP). Mohamed Abou-Donia, DukeUniversity Medical Center, will be hosting Wafa Hassen from the Department of Cellular Physiology and Toxicology at the High Institute of Biotechnology of Monastir, Tunisia, and Weimin Gao, Texas Tech University, will host Oladipo Ademuyiwa, from the Federal University of Agriculture in Abeokuta, Nigeria. SOT provides funding for the Scholars to attend the SOT Annual Meeting, and both Scholars have submitted abstracts. GSSEP funding also supports the extended exchange visit to the campuses of the Hosts as well as travel funding for the Hosts to visit the campus of the Scholars during the next year.Full Story

     

  • » September, 2015

    » September 2, 2015

    September 17, 2015

    September 28, 2015

    Chronic Wasting Disease found in Deer Near S.A.. Researchers, State Officials on Alert

     

    Lubbock, TX

     

    After deer with Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) were found this summer near San Antonio, researchers and public officials have been on alert to ensure the disease doesn't spread.

     

    The Texas Tech researchers say that CWD is one of many areas they are focused on right now, they explained that Texas Parks and Wildlife is more heavily involved in trying to curb the disease.

     

     

    Full Story

    Texas Tech El Paso Faculty Members Participate in Research Initiative

     

    Several faculty members with Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso have been chosen to participate in the Texas Tech Presidential Collaborative Research Initiative, a program designed to enhance collaborations between faculty with varying scientific expertise and lead to extra-mural funding.

    Full Story

    Jaclyn Canas-Carrell Wants to Help Others Follow in Her Footsteps

    Faculty member’s Hispanic heritage is a big part of her desire to help students succeed.

     

    Jaclyn Cañas-Carrell holds many positions: associate professor of analytical toxicology and environmental chemistry in the Texas Tech University Department of Environmental Toxicology and the Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH); faculty adviser to the Texas Tech chapter of the Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS); associate director of the university’s STEM Center for Outreach, Research and Education; wife, mother, sister, daughter and granddaughter. Full Story

     

  • » August, 2015

    » Aug 4, 2015

    West Nile virus found in Lubbock mosquitoes

     

    Lubbock,TX

     

    As part of their weekly testing around Lubbock, Texas Tech's Vectorbone Zoonoses Lab found two mosquito populations testing positive for West Nile Virus in west Lubbock between July 14-16 and in southeast Lubbock between July 21-23.

     

    While Dr. Steve Presley, Professor at Texas Tech's Environmental Toxicology, says he can't reveal the exact location where the West Nile positive mosquitoes came from, he assured EverythingLubbock.com that infected mosquitoes will be all around Lubbock soon.

     

    "Lubbock's not that big, if it's going on in one area, it's probably  going on in other parts of the city," said Dr. Presley, who has spent decades of his life researching mosquitoes and diseases.

    KAMC FULL STORY

     

     

              

    Play Video

  • » July, 2015

    » July 8, 2015

    Cattle Feed Yard Dust Can Transport Steroids Into Environment

    Environment: Airborne particles kicked up on cattle feed yards can carry steroids miles away

     

    To beef up their herds, many cattle ranchers give their livestock steroid growth hormones. Manure-laden runoff from cattle feed yards carries these endocrine-disrupting compounds into the environment, where they can adversely affect fish and other wildlife—and taint drinking water supplies. But these compounds also stick to dust, and a new study finds that airborne particulate matter may be a significant source of steroids from beef cattle feed yards in arid regions (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2015, DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.5b01881).

    Full Story

     

     

     

  • » June, 2015

    » June 1, 2015

    » June 1, 2015

    » June 24, 2015

    RESEARCHERS: FLOODING CAN HAVE LONG-LASTING IMPACT ON HEALTH, ENVIRONMENT

    From chemical exposure and mold to mosquitos, problems don’t stop when the rain does.

     

    Flooding of the magnitude recently seen in Houston and Austin has washed away homes, damaged property and even claimed lives, but those aren’t the only ways floodwater can be harmful.

    Todd Anderson, a professor in Texas Tech University’s Institute of Environmental and Human Health, said it’s not only the power of the water that can be dangerous, it’s also what could be in it.

    Full Story

     

     

     

    Recent Rainfall Increases Risk of Pests and Diseases

    Posted: June 11, 2015

     

    TIEHH expert expects mosquitos to be a big problem this year.

     

     As spring transitions into the warmer days of summer, many people may be planning to camp out, fire up the grill and enjoy the outdoors. But the recent rains mean something not so pleasant is on the horizon: a plethora of pests and the threats they carry.

    Full Story

     

     

    Alum Adam Finger Helps Get Scholarships for ENTX Graduate Students

     

    Thanks to help from an alumnus, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech University (TIEHH) recently received $7,500 from Terracon engineering consulting firm to provide six scholarships for graduate students.

     

    Todd Anderson, interim director of TIEHH, said master’s graduate Adam Finger, who now works as a project manager at Terracon, helped to secure the money for four current graduate students and two new ones this fall. The money came from the Terracon Foundation, which has given a total of $551,000 in philanthropic gifts since its inception in 2008.

  • » May, 2015

    » May 12, 2015

    Only on 6: What's in the Air?

    Posted: May 12, 2015 10:58 PM CST

     

     On a sunny afternoon in Wichita Falls, Amy Martz pushes her son on the Lucy Park swings.

     

    Neither have a care in the world.

     

    But a new study out of Texas Tech suggests those blue skies Martz's son is playing under could contain airborne particle pollution from cattle feed yards.  Scientists estimate that over 46,000 pounds of PM2.5, or very small particles, are released into the air every day from feedlots across the Southern Plains.Full Story

     

    Play Video

  • » April, 2015

    » April 1, 2015

    » April 14, 2015

    » April 30, 2015

    Path to success

    Specialty Fabrics Review | April 2015

     

    FiberTect® illustrates a successful strategy for commercializing a new technology.

     

    “Applied research deserves Nobel prizes,” proclaimed the editorial of Nature Materials in January 2010. Although the Nobels are known to be rewarded only to basic discoveries, there are plenty of examples to showcase rewarding research of applied nature—for example, the 2014 Award in Physics for blue light LEDs.

     

    More and more, academia is emphasizing translational research—research that leads to commercialization within a short period of time. There are many factors contributing to this mindset, such as a lack of federal dollars for a large number of principal investigator-initiated research, and the increase in industry collaboration and other economic incentives to the inventors.

    Full Story

     

    SESHADRI RAMKUMAR -  2015 Integrated Scholars at Texas Tech

     

    Professor Environmental Toxicology College of Arts and Sciences Institute of Environmental and Human Health

    Learn more about Integrated Scholar Seshadri Ramkumar in this question-and-answer session.

    Full Story

     

     

     

     

    Play Video

    Dr. Singh was recognized today for his nomination for the President’s Excellence in Diversity and Equity Award.

     

    Evy was the recipient of the President’s Excellence in Diversity and Equity Award in the student category!

     

     

  • » March, 2015

    » March 5, 2015

    » March 5, 2015

    » March 18, 2015

    Texas Tech Professors Commercialize Fibertect Invention

    Updated: March 5, 2015 9:45am CST

     

    LUBBOCK,TX- A Texas Tech University professor is marketing his invention for commercial purposes to create revenue for the university.

     

    In 1999, the Department of Defense contracted TTU professor, Dr. Seshadri Ramkumar, a material science specialist, to create a product that could help clean up chemical warfare.

     

    Dr. Ramkumar developed Fibertect, a woven material made out of cotton, and layered three times into a cloth that can clean up hazardous messes.

     

    The product is used by several government agencies but is now being developed for commercial purposes.  Full Story

     

    Play Video

    TTU researchers discover antibiotic resistance in West Texas feedlots

    Updated: Mar 11, 2015 7:05 PM CST

    LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) -

    Experts have raised many concerns about the extensive use of antibiotics on animals on these farms, but a team of researchers from Texas Tech's Institute of Environmental and Human Health collected air samples from different feedlots in our area and discovered an interesting strain of bacteria.

     

    "I think it's important to note that our discovery of antibiotics, genetic information, identifying a whole host of bacterial species and genetic sequences that indeed code for antibiotic resistance," Phil Smith, an associate professor at Texas Tech's Department of Toxicology, said.

    Full Story

    Play Video

    Inside Texas Tech: Cotton Technology Aims to Clean Oil-Affected Waters

    March 18, 2015   7:00 AM

    During the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, nearly 5 million gallons of crude oil was spewed into the Gulf of Mexico, making it the largest oil spill in U.S. history.

     

    The main cleanup method for the Deepwater Horizon oil was a chemical dispersant known as Corexit, which emulsifies leaked oil and allows degradation by bacteria in the water, preventing oil spill side effects like tarballs.

     

    But among claims that Corexit is toxic to marine life and increases its toxicity, cleanup authorities had to look elsewhere for ways to purify Gulf waters.

     

    Scientists 970 miles away in Lubbock, Texas, were developing what could be an alternative cleanup method - made of cotton. Full Story

  • » February, 2015

    » February 10, 2015

    » February 13, 2015

    » February 16, 2015

    Commercializing new technologies: The  FiberTect® experience

     A Success Story.

    The research carried out at Texas Tech University’s  Nonwovens & Advanced Materials Laboratory has been  focused on this aspect since the year 2000 and has had  success with the invention of “FiberTect®,” a dry  decontamination wipe.

     

    FiberTect is a classic example of mission- linked  research, which has both  basic and applied aspects  intertwined together. The  FiberTect story showcases  how an academic  laboratory, when it is able  to work on a project that’s  deemed to be an immediate  requirement by a customer,  can develop a commercial  product. In this case, the  customer is the U.S.

    Full Story

    Play Video

    Revolutionary TTU cotton product could protect troops, clean up oil spills

    Posted: Feb 13, 2015 6:57 PM CST

    By Patricia Villacin

     

     

    LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) -

    It starts as cotton straight from the bale, but in less than a minute, it turns into a powerful nonwoven wipe called "FiberTect."

    "[It is] fiber that protects, hence the name 'FiberTect,'" creator and Texas Tech Professor of Technical Textiles Seshadri Ramkumar said.

    Originally developed to protect the U.S. military from chemical and biological agents, Ramkumar obtained the patent for FiberTect back in 2009 and has been developing the product for the past 15 years. He said FiberTect is the product of a "mind-to-market" process called "translational research."

    Full Story

    Play Video

    KCBD INVESTIGATES: Are new water regulations worth the cost?

    Updated: Feb 16, 2015 8:01 PM CST

     

    Residents on the South Plains are watching their water rates skyrocket as municipalities work to become compliant with stricter water regulations.

    Back in 2001, the Environmental Protection Agency lowered the amount of arsenic allowed in drinking water. We have learned this new standard has affected at least three cities on the South Plains: Denver City, Seagraves and Wolfforth.

    The Environmental Protection Agency reports that long-term exposure to arsenic in drinking water has been linked to several different types of cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

    Ideally, the EPA wants to eliminate arsenic in drinking water altogether, but realizes this creates a financial burden for community water systems. The EPA changed the amount of arsenic allowed in drinking water from 50 parts per billion to 10 parts per billion, stating in their ruling that the cost is justified by the benefits.

    Full Story

     

    Play Video

  • » January, 2015

    » January 12, 2015

    » January 16, 2015

    » January 22, 2015

    » January 29, 2015

    TIEHH Faculty Highlighted in the Texas Tech Discoveries

    News Publication

    • Providing the World a Safe & Secure Food Supply

    The world's population is projected to grow to nine billion by 2050. Will there be enough food to feed the population? Will the food produced be safe?

    • Food Safety, Food Security & Public Health Research- The ICFIE team's public health efforts also focus reducing cases of E. coli, salmonella and listeria, another foodborne illness as well as looking at implications of antimicrobial resistance.

    • The Animal To Human Connection- Researchers at TIEHH are focused on public health surveillance for man-made contaninants and biological threats that naturally occur in the environment, as well as various pathogens and toxins that may be intentionally introduced.

    • Human Health Concerns- TIEHH is also bringing its chemical analysis expertise to bear on potential public health concerns through man-made contamination

    Full Story

    Distinguished Lectureship in Quail Management set January 16th in Dallas

     

    Annual event to focus on eyeworms in Texas quail

     

    Writer: Steve Byrns, 325-653-4576, s-byrns@tamu.edu

    Contact: Dr. Dale Rollins, 325-653-4576, d-rollins@tamu.edu

     

    DALLAS – The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service will conduct the Distinguished Lectureship in Quail Management from 9 a.m.-noon  January 16th in Dallas.

     

    The seminar, featuring the topic “On the Trail of the Eyeworm in Texas Bobwhites,” will be in Seminar Hall C4 of the Dallas Convention Center. The program is being held in conjunction with the Dallas Safari Club’s annual convention. Admission to the quail lectureship is free, but admission to the safari club’s trade show is $20.

     

    “Eyeworms have been identified as a contender for the ‘smoking gun’ involved with the years long decline of wild quail numbers across the state,” said Dr. Dale Rollins, AgriLife Extension’s statewide coordinator for the Reversing the Quail Decline Initiative at San Angelo. “Dr. Ronald Kendall, professor of toxicology at Texas Tech University’s Texas Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Lubbock, will be our keynote speaker.

    Full Story

    Environmental Scientists Find Antibiotics, Bacteria, Resistance Genes in Feedlot Dust

    Texas Tech researchers are beginning to understand how antibiotic-resistant bacteria travel aerially.

     

    After testing dust in the air near cattle feedlots in the Southern High Plains, researchers at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech University found evidence of antibiotics, feedlot-derived bacteria and DNA sequences that encode for antibiotic resistance. The study was published online in the National Institutes of Environmental Science’s peer-reviewed journal, Environmental Health Perspectives. The research was funded through a grant from Texas Tech’s College of Arts and Sciences. It is the first study documenting aerial transmission of antibiotic resistance from an open-air farm setting.

    Full Story

    Researchers Receive Grant to Study Quail Parasite Infections

    Wildlife Toxicology Laboratory will continue to study eyeworms and cecal worms infecting wild bobwhite quail.

     

    The Wildlife Toxicology Laboratory at Texas Tech University received a $305,171 award from Park Cities Quail to continue research on the impact of eyeworm infections in wild bobwhite quail in the Rolling Plains of West Texas.

     

    The laboratory already has received more than $1.6 million from the Rolling Plains Quail Research Foundation, Park Cities Quail and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service to discover what is causing northern bobwhite populations to decline.

    Full Story

  • » December, 2014

    11 Faculty Members Chosen as 2015 Integrated Scholars

     

    I am pleased to announce eleven faculty members as Integrated Scholars for 2015. An Integrated Scholar at Texas Tech University is a faculty member who demonstrates significant accomplishments and effective synergy among the major professorial functions of teaching, research, and service.

     

    Full Story

  • » September, 2014

    » September 21, 2014

    STEMs of Success

     

    Jaclyn Cañas-Carrell impacts the science, technology, engineering and math community through her commitment to service and research in environmental toxicology.

    She was encouraged by her parents and teachers to become a physician, but Jaclyn Cañas-Carrell took her career in a different direction when she discovered a love of environmental toxicology as an undergraduate research assistant at Texas Tech University.

    “I had an excellent research mentor,” Cañas-Carrell said, referring to Todd Anderson, a professor of environmental chemistry and chair of the Department of Environmental Toxicology.

    Cañas-Carrell did get accepted to medical school, but she ultimately chose to stay at Texas Tech and follow her passion to earn a doctorate in environmental toxicology.

    Today, she is an associate professor of analytic toxicology and environmental chemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences, and is making her own impact on the lives of countless science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) students.

     

    Full Story

  • » August, 2014

    » August 14, 2014

    Researchers: Blood-Sucking Eyeworm Culprit to Quail Decline

     

    In the summer of 2010, the Rolling Plains of West Texas expected a bumper crop of quail. By October, they nearly had vanished. To find out why, researchers necropsied hundreds of birds throughout a 19-million-acre area of land and discovered large numbers of parasitic eyeworms in many of the birds they sampled.

    Now, as part of the largest quail disease study ever undertaken in the U.S., scientists at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech University believe they have found a major culprit.

     

    Continue Reading»

     

  • » July, 2014

    » July 30, 2014

    » July 31, 2014

    » July 31, 2014

    Texas Tech Receives Research Investment

     

    Texas Tech received a research investment Wednesday, totaling more than $850,000 from the Deer Breeders Corporation to support white-tailed deer and cervids research.

     

    The program, which takes place at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, is led by Ernest Smith and Steve Presley, Tech associate professors, and Galen Austin, a senior research associate, in collaboration with the corporation, according to a Tech news release.

     

    The funds will be used to establish a white-tailed deer and cervids, species similar to the white-tailed deer in the deer family, research program at Tech, according to the release, and will include the construction of a dedicated research facility.

     

    Continue Reading»

    Texas Tech Researchers Discover Low-Grade Nonwoven Cotton Picks Up 50 Times Own Weight of Oil

     

    Texas Tech University researchers recently discovered that low-grade cotton made into an absorbent nonwoven mat can collect up to 50 times its own weight in oil.

    The results strengthen the use of cotton as a natural sorbent for oil, said Seshadri Ramkumar, professor in the Department of Environmental Toxicology at Texas Tech who led the research. The results were published in the American Chemical Society’s journal Industry & Engineering Chemistry Research.

    Ramkumar is a creator of Fibertect®, a nonwoven decontamination wipe developed by researchers at Texas Tech capable of cleaning chemical and biological agents. Vinitkumar Singh, a doctoral candidate working under Ramkumar, performed the experiments in this study. This multidisciplinary project involved scientists from Cotton Incorporated and Texas Tech’s Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Environmental Toxicology.

     

    Continue Reading»

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    Money earmarked for cervid research at Texas Tech

     

    Texas Tech University officials celebrated a research investment on July 30 totaling more than $850,000 in support of a white-tailed deer and cervids research program at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health.

     

    Led by associate professors Ernest Smith and Steve Presley and senior research associate Galen Austin, the research project is part of an ongoing collaboration between the university and the Deer Breeders Corp.

     

    As part of the overall investment, the Deer Breeders Corp. recently provided a $325,000 gift to the program, which is in addition to an initial start-up grant and other investments valued at approximately $370,000 from the company.

    Full Story

  • » June, 2014

    » June 1

    » June 4

    » June 13

    » June 24

    » June 30

    Dr. Kenneth R. Dixon granted emeritus status

     

    Upon approval from the Texa​​s Tech University Board of Regents, Dr. Kenneth R. Dixon has become the first Department of Environmental Toxicology faculty member to be granted emeritus status.  Congratulations Dr. Dixon!

    2014 Integrated Scholar: Todd Anderson

    Published environmental chemistry professor excels as a researcher and academic.

     

    Environmental chemistry professor Todd Anderson holds a solid position among the ranks of Texas Tech’s Integrated Scholars. He joined the university’s faculty in 1997, and since that time Anderson has established himself as an accomplished researcher and an engaging academician. His scholarship tracks the movement of chemical contaminants through the environment, an area of great interest and on​​e with global implications. Anderson has been prolific as a researcher. Over the years he has amassed more than 170 journal publications, more than 8,500 total citations and numerous awards, including the TTU System Chancellor’s Distinguished Research Award in 2004.

    Full Story

     

    question and answer/video section -Click Here»

    2014 Integrated Scholar: Jaclyn Cañas-Carrell

    Serving as a mentor, professor and researcher Cañas-Carell open doors for many individuals.

     

    A dedicated practitioner of the Integrated Scholar concept, TIEHH associate professor Jaclyn Cañas-Carrell works to open doorways into science for students from underrepresented groups. She serves as director of the Plains Bridges to the Baccalaureate (PBB) Program, which has supported minority science students of South Plains College in successfully transferring to Texas Tech since 2008. Also, she serves as the College of Arts and Sciences associate director in the Texas Tech STEM Center for Outreach, Research and Education. In recognition of her efforts to promote and support diversity on campus, Cañas-Carrell received the TTU President’s Excellence in Diversity and Equity Award in 2009 and 2013.

    Full Story

    Texas Deer Association teaming with Texas Tech to

    study Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease

     

     The Texas Deer Association has announced its commitment to support whitetail deer research conducted at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech University.

     

    The TDA Board of Directors authorized a financial contribution dedicated to the construction and development of the Texas Tech facility at their quarterly board meeting in May 2014.

    Full Story

    Alum Adam Finger Helps Get Scholarships for ENTX Graduate Students

     

    Thanks to help from an alumnus, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech University (TIEHH) recently received $7,200 from Terracon engineering consulting firm to provide six scholarships for graduate students.

    Todd Anderson, interim director of TIEHH, said master’s graduate Adam Finger, who now works as a project manager at Terracon, helped to secure the money for four current graduate students and two new ones this fall. The money came from the Terracon Foundation, which has given a total of $551,000 in philanthropic gifts since its inception in 2008.

    Full Story

  • » February, 2014

    » Feb 13, 2014

    » Feb 17, 2015

    Texas Tech Receives $1.1 Million Renewal Grant to Encourage Science Education

     

    The National Institutes of Health recently renewed its $1.1 million grant to continue Texas Tech University’s Plains Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program with South Plains College. Program director Jaclyn Cañas-Carrell announced the renewed five-year grant. The program partners with educators and minority science students at South Plains College to help those students transfer successfully from the college to Texas Tech. Others involved in securing the renewal include Texas Tech faculty and administration members Kamaleshwar Singh, Juan Muñoz, Patrick Hughes and Zenaida Aguirre-Muñoz, and Jay Driver and Leanna Smith at South Plains College.

    Full Story

     

     

    BSL-3 Lab Provides New Opportunities

     

    Texas Tech University has dedicated a new Biological Threat Research Laboratory.

    The biological safety level three (BSL-3) laboratory will provide new opportunities for Texas Tech researchers by giving scientists the ability to perform both basic and applied research related to biological pathogens and toxins that impact human and animal health.

    Full Story

  • » January, 2014

    » January 9, 2014

    » January 10, 2014

    Tech receives $1.1 million to assist minority science students at South Plains College

     

    The National Institutes of Health recently renewed its $1.1 million grant to continue Texas Tech University’s Plains Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program with South Plains College.

     

    Program director Jaclyn Cañas-Carrell announced the renewed five-year grant. The program partners with educators and minority science students at South Plains College to help those students transfer successfully from the college to Texas Tech.

     

    Others involved in securing the renewal include Texas Tech faculty and administration members Kamaleshwar Singh, Juan Muñoz, Patrick Hughes and Zenaida Aguirre-Muñoz, and Jay Driver and Leanna Smith at South Plains College.

    Full Story

     

    Texas Tech announces grant to Deer Breeder's Corp

     

    Researchers at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech University recently received a start-up grant from the Deer Breeders Corp. to look for drug residues and study insect-borne disease transmission dynamics in white-tailed deer.

     

    The goal of the partnership between Texas Tech and Deer Breeders Corp. is to strengthen and promote an emerging and growing sector of the agricultural industry.

    Full Story

     

  • » December, 2013

    » December 2, 2013

    » December 6, 2013

    Dragonfly's wings inspire development of biocides in textiles

     

    According to Seshadri Ramkumar, Associate Professor of Non-Wovens at Texas Tech University the textiles sector can benefit from research and development activities in developing next generation functional textiles as more and more scientists are mimicking nature to develop functional properties such as waterproofing, changes in surface adhesion and biocidal characteristics.

    Full Story

     

     

    Jaclyn E. Cañas-Carrell receives 13th annual Chancellor's Council Distinguished faculty award

     

    Texas Tech University System Chancellor Kent Hance today (Dec. 6) announced recipients of the 13th annual Chancellor's Council distinguished faculty awards. Recognizing excellence in teaching, research and commercialization, these awards represent the most prestigious honors granted to faculty members throughout the TTU System.

     

    Full Story

  • » November, 2013

    » November 17, 2013

    Rolling Plains Quail Research Foundation initiates phase three of groundbreaking "Operation Idiopathic Decline" study of disease in quail

     

    New research to explore potential treatment for parasites.

     

    Continue Reading»

     

  • » September, 2013

    » September 4, 2013

    » September 5, 2013

    Ramkumar's Research: Building a Better World Through Technical Textiles

     

    At the forefront of this technology stands Texas Tech University Professor Seshadri Ramkumar, of the Department of Environmental Toxicology's Institute for Environmental & Human Health (TIEHH). He and his team of researchers in the Nonwovens & Advanced Materials Laboratory are testing, developing and producing new substances that may make the world a cleaner, safer more comfortable place to live. TTU Ph.D. candidate Sudheer Jinka is conducting atmospheric plasma research, and TTU Ph.D. candidate Vinitkumar Singh is conducting research on cotton sorption for oil spills.

     

    Full Story

     

    The Plains Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program, funded by NIH, was successful in obtaining competitive renewal funding for another 5 years.

     

    The grant is for $1.1 million for 5 years. To date, 39 students have transferred to TTU and 11 students have earned BS degrees in science related fields from TTU. Jaclyn Cañas-Carrell is the Program Director and senior personnel include Kamaleshwar Singh (Environmental Toxicology), Zenaida Aguirre-Muñoz (COE), Patrick Hughes, Juan Muñoz and several South Plains College faculty.

    Full Story

     

  • » August, 2013

    » August 6, 2013

    » August 14, 2013

    » August 14, 2013

    » August 27, 2013

    » August 27, 2013

    Texas: turning substandard cotton into eco-friendly products

     

    Immature cotton due to Texas droughts is being turned into oil-spill wipes and decontaminants. But does this innovation mask the true environmental problems?

     

    Continue Reading»

    Researchers Study Environmental Impact of World's Strongest-Known Substance

     

    When it comes to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the soil, recent research at Texas Tech University shows that the new materials do not affect the sorption of the toxic part of oil called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs). Scientists at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health say that’s one very small piece in a very large puzzle in trying to understand the possible environmental impact of CNTs – a new material with myriad uses, yet unregulated at the nano-scale by the regulatory agencies.

     

    Continue Reading»

    TTU Quail Researchers Receive $244,000 in Grants

     

    Researchers at Texas Tech University received $244,000 from the Dallas-based nonprofit Park Cities Quail to fund two different research projects involving the recent rapid decline in the state’s quail population.

     

    Continue Reading»

     

    Where have the quail gone?

     

    Mysterious decline in quail population prompts the largest research project of its kind.

     

    Continue Reading»

     

    Correlation Between Heavy Metals and Turtle Abundance in Ponds Near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

     

    Continue Reading»

     

     

  • » July, 2013

    » July 1, 2013

    Researchers Find Cancer Risks Double When Two Carcinogens Present at 'Safe' Level

     

    Science knows that arsenic and estrogen can cause cancer. At certain very low levels, the chemicals offer little to no threats to human health. However, new research conducted by Texas Tech University scientists has found that low doses of both chemicals together – even at levels low enough to be considered “safe” for humans if they were on their own – can cause cancer in prostate cells. The combination of the two chemicals was almost twice as likely to create cancer in prostate cells, the research found. The study published online in the peer-reviewed journal The Prostate.

     

    Continue Reading »

  • » June, 2013

    » June 5, 2013

    Alumni Research highlighted on the front cover of Environmental Sciences: Processes & Impacts

     

    Dr. Shibin Li worked in Dr. Canas-Carrell's lab and graduated in August 2012. He is currently a post-doc at the US EPA in Duluth, MN. His dissertation research examining the effects of carbon nanotubes on the sorption behavior of PAHs was selected as the feature article on the cover of Environmental Sciences: Processes and Impacts (formerly Journal of Environmental Monitoring).

     

  • » May, 2013

    » May 1, 2013

    » May 3, 2013

    » May 15, 2013

    Texas Tech director emeritus receives award

     

    Dr. Ronald J. Kendall, director emeritus of The Institute of Environmental and Human Health and also a special assistant to the president in the Office of the President, received a 2013 Texas Environmental Excellence Award by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality signed by Governor Rick Perry in Austin, Texas on May 1, 2013.

     

    Continue Reading »

    Dr. Jaclyn Cañas-Carrell Received the 2012-2013 President’s Excellence In Diversity and Equity award

     

    The President's Excellence in Diversity and Equity Awards recognize Texas Tech faculty, staff, and students in their efforts to make Texas Tech a welcoming campus through their commitment to service, mutual respect, academic and intellectual freedom, and diversity.

     

    Continue Reading »

     

    Texas Tech Researchers Find Environmental Application For Low-Grade Cotton

    ​Raw Cotton Absorbs Crude Oil Spills and Repels Water

     

    Memphis, TN - Research conducted at the Nonwovens and Advanced Materials Laboratory at Texas Techs' Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH) shows that low-grade cotton is highly effective at absorbing crude oil spills. The study, published in the most recent issue of the American Chemical Society journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, reveals that one pound of low-micronaire cotton can absorb more than 30 pounds of dense crude oil. In addition, the natural waxiness of raw, unprocessed cotton fiber keeps water out, making cotton an efficient and effective material for addressing ocean-based oil spills. The study was supported in part by Cotton Incorporated. mutual respect, academic and intelle​ctual freedom, and diversity.

     

    Continue Reading »

     

    Video»

     

  • » April, 2013

    » April 12

    Will the oil & gas boom reach Lubbock?

     

    On Friday, the Lubbock Economic Development Alliance hosted a luncheon exploring the possibilities. Experts from the Permian Basin Petroleum Association teamed up with Texas Tech University for "Drilling Down" a look at Lubbock's future in the oil and gas industry Friday morning at the Texas Tech Club. Dr. Ron Kendall with Texas Tech says a increase in production is coming.

     

    Continue Reading »

  • » March, 2013

    » March 4

    New Version of Texas Tech’s Fibertect® Proves Better at Decontaminating Nerve Gas Surrogate in Lab Testing

     

    Seshadri Ramkumar, lead investigator on the project and inventor of Fibertect®, said that when compared to the powdered decontaminant called M-291, the all-cotton version of nonwoven wipe paired with an activated carbon center cleaned up not only the chemical surrogate to the nerve gas soman, but also adsorbed its vapors five times better.

     

    Continue Reading »

     

  • » December, 2012

    »December 5, 2012

    A new study from Texas Tech University has found that plastic toys, such as bumper toys used for training, may be exposing our dogs to harmful chemicals including bisphenol-A (BPA) and phtalates, which could pose a health risk.

     

     Philip Smith, co-author of the study and a toxicologist at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech, became curious about how these toys may be affecting his own dogs.

     

    Continue Reading »

  • » October, 2012

    » October 15, 2012

    » October 15, 2012

    » October 18, 2012

    » October 20, 2012

    » October 23, 2012

    Science students and a Scientist of the Year will be honored by the Lubbock Chapter of Achievement Rewards for College Scientists during a reception and dinner program at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 24 at the Lubbock Women’s Club.

    The 22nd annual Society of Environmental Journalists is scheduled to meet in Lubbock this week.

     

    The conference will begin on Wednesday and run through Sunday. Five hundred reporters from organizations such as National Geographic, The New York Times, ABC News and more are expected to be in attendance. The 2012 conference theme for Lubbock is “Big Land, Big Sky, Big Issues.”

     

    Continue Reading »

     

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) could pave the way for remarkable technology, from improved computer chips, flexible computer screens or body armor, to health applications such as bone healing and cancer treatments.

     

    In an effort to determine the toxicity of these materials, a group of Texas Tech researchers has successfully built a testing apparatus that can quantify the presence of CNT in a given sample. It is a process easier said than done.

     

    Continue Reading »

    A group of journalists covering the environment from over the nation wind up a tour of West Texas today and they say they've learned a lot from the land of the big sky.

     

    Since Wednesday in a conference held in Lubbock, a group of 34 reporters of the Society of Environmental Journalists have discussed topics like sustainable agriculture and crops of the future; they've examined climate change through history and taken a look at Texas Tech's tornado and geospatial labs.

     

    Continue Reading »

    Wipes sector, which is an important and growing product category in the nonwovens industry, has witnessed a major merger and new investments recently.

     

    In November last year, Suominen Nonwens acquired Ahlstrom Coproration's Home and Personal Business area,​ making it a world leader in wipes.  In the Asia Pacific region, investments are happening rapidly in the wipes sector.  Most recently, Andritz Perfojet is supplying complete spunlace line to Precot Meridian Ltd.  Andritz's spunlace line will be commissioned in Karnataka State, Southern India, and is expected to begin its production in the first quarter of 2013.  Apart from the acquisitions and new investments that are taking place in the wipes sector, interest is emerging on the use of biodegradable materials and recycled fibers to develop sustainable wipes.

     

    Continue Reading »

  • » September, 2012

    »September 13, 2012

    This year may be the worst-ever West Nile outbreak in U.S. history, but most cases came from just a handful of states.

    The highest concentration of severe infections was found in Texas. Experts say the hot, sticky Texas summer led to nearly 45 percent of the nation’s West Nile virus (WNV) cases, but the high percentage is not only because the state’s mosquito numbers have been particularly high. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the 2012 heat wave has made for more potent insects.

     

    Continue Reading »

  • » July, 2017

    » July

  • » March, 2017

    » March 14

    » March 14

    » March 14

  • » February, 2017

    » February 2

    » February 13

  • » October, 2016

    » October 12

    » October 28

    » October

    Kia Hayes awarded the San Francisco Bay American Cetacean Society Chapter Research Grant Award

    Kia Hayes was awarded the  $1,000.00  from the San Francisco Bay American Cetacean Society Chapter Research Grant Award for her research on “Contaminant concentrations in Eastern North Pacific gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) – spatial and temporal patterns and influence of life-history parameters.”

     

    Texas Tech Graduate School Awarded Grant-in-Aid  to

    Kia Hayes & Kelsey Thompson

    Fall 2016 Grant-in-Aid Award was given to Kia Hayes and Kelsey Thompson through the

    Texas Tech University Graduate School to fund research.

  • » July, 2016

    » July

  • » April, 2016

    » April 1

    » April 6

    » April 7

    » April 8

    » April 25

    » April 26

    3 Minute Thesis Competition Award Winner

    Evelyn Reategui participated at the 3 Minute Thesis Competition organized by Graduate School Friday April 1st. She won 1st place and the People’s Choice Award.

    “A raider who rocks” award  in Diversity

     

    Evelyn Reategui was awarded the "Raider who rocks" award.

    Graduate Poster Competition

    Evelyn Reategui earned 2nd place at the Graduate Poster Competition in my category “Our impact in the environment”.

    LE-SETAC is “A Raider who Rocks”.

     

    LE-SETAC was recognized for our community service and leadership efforts.

    Big thanks to everyone that supports the organization.

     

     

    Doctoral student Evelyn Reátegui-Zirena won the Three Minute Thesis competition for her presentation on her environmental toxicology research.

    Texas Tech University doctoral candidate Evelyn Reátegui-Zirena recently won the Graduate School’s Three Minute Thesis competition with a presentation on her research regarding toxicology and the effects of human contamination on aquatic environments.

     

    Reátegui-Zirena , originally from Peru, studied biology as an undergraduate, environmental science as a master’s student and now specializes in environmental toxicology as a doctoral student at Texas Tech.

    Full Story

    President’s Excellence in Diversity and Equity Award ceremony

     

    On Tuesday April 26, 2016 , Dr. Ram, Logeswari Ponnusamy and Amanda French were recognized for their outstanding vision, dedication, and commitment to inclusive excellence at the President’s Excellence in Diversity and Equity Award ceremony. They received the TTU President's Excellence in Diversity and Equity award 2016.

  • » September, 2015

    » Sept. 9, 2015

    » Sept. 28, 2015

    LE-SETAC received two awards at the 2015 Texas Tech University Student Organization Awards

    Evelyn Reátegui-Zirena and Mary Gendron accept two awards on behalf of the Llano Estacado Student Chapter of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.  LE-SETAC was awarded the Most Improved Student Organization of the Year and also received the Community Service Award for outstanding service to Texas Tech University.

                

    Amanda Cano

    Awarded Scholarship

    Amanda Cano was awarded a scholarship from the Hispanic Association of Women in Lubbock, a group that promotes education and empowers women and youth since 1983.

  • » August, 2015

    » August 28, 2015

    » August 28, 2016

    » August 28, 2017

    Deer Breeder Corp. Awarded Shanoy Anderson the

    "Making a Difference Award"

    in Appreciation for her commitment

    to the TTU/DBC Deer Research Program

    Chris Timmons- DBC President

    and Shanoy Anderson

    2015 TIEHH Alumni Scholarships were Awarded to Caleshia Summers and Kelsey Thompson

    2015 Terracon Scholarships were awarded to the following students:

     

    (from left to Right)

    Jacob Carrick, Kimberly Wooten,

    Kia Hayes, Steven Lasee, Michelle McManus,

    Adric Olson, Jordan Hunter, Steve Peper

  • » July, 2015

    SETAC Llano Estacado Student Chapter Awarded Texas Tech's Most Improved Student Organization

     

    Wouldn’t you like to share your life in a way that matters? That is what students from Llano Estacado-SETAC (LE-SETAC) try to do. LE-SETAC is the student chapter at Texas Tech University (TTU) in Lubbock, Texas, and awardee of the most improved student organization of 2014–2015. LE-SETAC focuses its energy and efforts on two main groups:  young minds and the local community.  LE-SETAC’s outreach activities have primarily centered on elementary and middle school education with science presentations, hands-on experiments and help with science fair judging. These activities give their members additional opportunities to interact with local teachers and students.Full Story

  • » June, 2015

    » June 24, 2015

    Logeswari Ponnusamy Received Prestigious 100 Inspiring Women in STEM Award

     

    The award, presented by INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, recognizes the work by individuals in STEM and who serve as inspirations to others.

     

    Two women at Texas Tech University have been honored for their efforts to enhance participation on individual STEM field while inspiring others to pursue careers in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

     

    Logeswari Ponnusamy, a doctoral student in Environmental Toxicology at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), was named to the list of 100 Inspiring Women in STEM Award by INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine.Full Story

  • » May, 2015

    » May 7, 2015

    » May 28-30, 2015

    GSAC Announces the Recipients of the 2015 GSAC Research Grants-in-Aid!

    Posted on May 7, 2015

     

    The Graduate Student Advisory Council (GSAC) is very pleased to announce the first two recipients in our Research Grants-in-Aid Program:

     

        Evelyn Reátegui, a Ph.D. student in Environmental Toxicology researching energy allocation patterns in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to two contaminants

     

        Meghan Cromie, a Ph.D. student in Environmental Toxicology researching how Epigallocatechin-3-gallate enhances the therapeutic effects of Leptomycin B on human lung cancer cells

     

    The GSAC Grants-in-Aid for Research Program provides financial assistance to graduate students at Texas Tech University who are in need of funds to successfully complete their research (thesis or non-thesis based). Any Texas Tech University Student pursuing a master's or doctoral degree who has completed a minimum of one semester in residence is eligible. GSAC raises funds to support the Grants-in-Aid for Research Program through sales of GSAC Gear and other fundraisers. Full Story

     

    Regional SETAC Meeting Award Winners

    TIEHH Students represented TIEHH very well at the Regional SETAC Competition on May 28-30, 2015  in Lafayette, LA.

     

    • Francis Loko - 3rd place in the oral presentations.
    • Adric Olson - Selected as Student Representative for the regional chapter.
    • Melissa - Selected as Treasurer for the regional chapter.

     

     

  • » April, 2015

    » April 10, 2016

    » April 10, 2015

    Congratulations!

    Competition Winners

     

    Toxicology Category

    Heather Lanza, 1st Place

     

    Evelyn Reátegui-Zirena Ph.D., 2nd Place

    Congratulations!

    TTU Graduate Student Research Poster

    Competition Winners

     

    Science II Category

     

    Logeswari Ponnusamy, 1st Place

    Heather Lanza, 2nd Place

    Evelyn Reátegui-Zirena Ph.D., 3rd Place

  • » November, 2014

    » Nov. 12, 2014

    » Nov. 15, 2015

    Environmental Toxicology PhD Student Reátegui-Zirena Awarded

     

     

    EVELYN REÁTEGUI-ZIRENA, a third-year PhD student in the Department of Environmental Toxicology, received an award for 2014 Outstanding Oral Presentation at the 2014 conference of the Society for Advancement of Hispanics/Chicanos & Native Americans in Science (SACNAS). The award was for the presentation of the first part of her thesis, "Interactive effects of cadmium and diet on bioenergetic endpoints in the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis".

     

    "My goal is to detect ecologically relevant effects of chemical stressors in gastropods based on their energy allocation patterns," Reátegui-Zirena said in a statement.

    Congratulations! Kayla Campasino won SETAC poster Competition this November, 2014

     

    Kayla Campasino was awarded 3rd Place in the  2014 SETAC poster Competition

    » Nov. 12, 2014

    » Nov. 15, 2015

    Environmental Toxicology PhD Student Reátegui-Zirena Awarded

     

     

    EVELYN REÁTEGUI-ZIRENA, a third-year PhD student in the Department of Environmental Toxicology, received an award for 2014 Outstanding Oral Presentation at the 2014 conference of the Society for Advancement of Hispanics/Chicanos & Native Americans in Science (SACNAS). The award was for the presentation of the first part of her thesis, "Interactive effects of cadmium and diet on bioenergetic endpoints in the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis".

     

    "My goal is to detect ecologically relevant effects of chemical stressors in gastropods based on their energy allocation patterns," Reátegui-Zirena said in a statement.

    Congratulations! Kayla Campasino won SETAC poster Competition this November, 2014

     

    Kayla Campasino was awarded 3rd Place in the  2014 SETAC poster Competition

  • » October, 2014

    » October, 2014

    Evelyn Reategui received an award for her presentation at the 2014 SACNAS National Conference. Evelyn “Evy” Reategui recently presented her research at the National SACNAS (Society for the Advancement of Hispanics/Chicanos and Native Americans in Science) Conference in Los Angeles, CA. Evy received an award for her presentation. She is also a scholarship recipient from the Hispanic Association of Women in Lubbock.

  • » May, 2014

    » May 31, 2014

    SETAC Competition Winners

    TIEHH Students won several awards at the Regional SETAC Competition on May 30-31, 2014

     

    Jarrett Louder, 3rd Place Poster Contest

    Amanda Parra, 3rd Place Platform Presentation

    Rebecca Cochran, 2nd Place Platform Competition

     

     

  • » October, 2013

    » October 6, 2013

    Amanda won the Outstanding Graduate Student Oral Presentation in Environmental Sciences at the 40th Society for the Advancement of Hispanics/Chicanos and Native Americans in Science Meeting held in SanAntonio on October 3-6, 2013.

    Full Story

     

     

  • » July, 2013

    » July 1, 2013

    Sygenta Crop Protection and Waste Control Specialists Outstanding Students Awards Announced

     

    ~ Sygenta Award Recipients

     

    ~ Waste Control Specialists Award Recipients

     

    The Syngenta and the Waste Control Specialists Outstanding Doctoral and Masters Student awards

    were given at the TIEHH Spring banquet in April.

     

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